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Attention Deficit and Learning Disorders

  • Kathy S. Katz

Abstract

The term learning disabled has been applied to those children who have trouble with academic learning despite the fact that they have no apparent physical, intellectual, sensory, or emotional handicap (Federal Law 94-142). The child’s problems with learning may be evidenced in one or more academic subject areas although the most common learning disability is reading disability.

Keywords

Learning Disability Reading Disability Disable Child Learn Disability Neurological Soft Sign 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathy S. Katz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Child Development CenterGeorgetown UniversityUSA

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