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Principles Of Rhizobium Strain Selection

  • Jake Halliday

Abstract

The following account outlines one approach to the selection Rhizobium strains for use in legume seed inoculants. The procedures described were used successfully in a specific program concerned with the selection of appropriate rhizobia for forage legume introductions in acid, infertile soils of tropical Latin America (Halliday, 1979). The principles underlying the approach apply equally well to other programs, and some examples of alternative methodologies are mentioned in the text. Provided they take account of the underlying principles of Rhizobium strain selection stressed in this article, individual investigators can modify the techniques and improvise with equipment to suit their own purposes and the facilities available to them.

Keywords

Growth Tube Legume Species Rhizobium Strain Selection Program Fixation Effectiveness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. R. A. Date and J. Halliday, in: Handbook for the Collection, Preservation and Characterization of Tropical Forage Gerplasm Resources, CIAT, Colombia, pp. 21–26 (1979a).Google Scholar
  2. R. A. Date and J. Halliday, Nature (London), 277: 62–64 (1979b).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. R. A. Date and J. Halliday, in: Advances in Legume Science, Kew, England, pp. 575–601 (1980).Google Scholar
  4. J. Halliday, in: Pasture Production in Acid Soils of the Tropics, CIAT, Colombia, pp. 123–127 (1979).Google Scholar
  5. J. Halliday, Workshop on Agrotechnology Transfer, Benchmark Soils Project, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii (1981a).Google Scholar
  6. J. Halliday, in: Global Impacts of Applied Microbiology (S. 0. Emejuaiwex, 0. Ogunbi, and S. 0. Sanni, eds.), Academic Press, New York, pp. 73–84 (1981b).Google Scholar
  7. J. Halliday, in: Workshop on Innovative Biological Technologies for Lesser Developed Countries, Office of Technology Assessment, Washington, D.C., pp. 243–273 (1981a).Google Scholar
  8. NifTAL, International Network of Legume Inoculation Trials, Experiment A, University of Hawaii NifTAL Project, Honolulu, Hawaii (1980).Google Scholar
  9. NifTAL, International Network of Legume Inoculation Trials, Experiment B, University of Hawaii NifTAL Project, Honolulu, Hawaii (1982).Google Scholar
  10. P. Somasegaran, H. Hoben, and J. Halliday, Practical Exercises in Legume/Rhizobium Technology, University of Hawaii NifTAL Project, Honolulu, Hawaii (1979).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jake Halliday
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Hawaii NifTAL ProjectPaia, MauiUSA

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