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The Roger Stevens Years

  • Fannie Taylor
  • Anthony L. Barresi
Part of the Nonprofit Management and Finance book series (IAUS, volume 85)

Abstract

“If Stevens didn’t exist, we would have to invent him,” once remarked Abe Fortas, former justice of the Supreme Court.1 The Fortas comment sums the quality of this complex and brilliant man appointed by President Johnson to be the first chairman of the National Council for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Keywords

Real Estate National Council Council Member Special Assistant National Endowment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference Notes

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fannie Taylor
    • 1
  • Anthony L. Barresi
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin — MadisonMadisonUSA

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