Preparing the Client for Transition to the Community

  • Stephen C. Luce
  • Stephen R. Anderson
  • Susan F. Thibadeau
  • Lee E. Lipsker

Abstract

Within the last two decades there have been phenomenal advances in the development of effective procedures used with handicapped children (Ross, 1981) and adults (Krasner, 1982). Despite these exciting advances, mental health professionals are in much turmoil regarding a number of fundamental issues of client care.

Keywords

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen C. Luce
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Anderson
    • 1
  • Susan F. Thibadeau
    • 1
  • Lee E. Lipsker
    • 2
  1. 1.The May InstituteChathamUSA
  2. 2.University of KansasLawrenceUSA

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