On the Apocryphal Nature of Inequity Distress

  • Jerald Greenberg
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (CISJ)

Abstract

The basic assumptions of contemporary equity theories (e.g., Adams, 1963, 1965; Walster, Berscheid, & Walster, 1973) are that: (1) States of inequity lead to distress, and (2) Persons act so as to redress inequity cognitively or behaviorally in order to relieve their distress. Despite the fundamental nature of these assumptions, they have been the subject of surprisingly little empirical research, a situation that some observers have found disquieting.

Keywords

Posit Stake Proac 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerald Greenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Management and Human Resources, College of Administrative ScienceOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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