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Notes toward an Interactionist-Motivational Theory of the Determinants and Development of (Pro)Social Behavior

Chapter
Part of the Critical Issues in Social Justice book series (BLSC, volume 31)

Abstract

The determinants of certain kinds of behavior, such as positive conduct, can be understood only in the framework of a more general theory of social behavior. We cannot simply ask whether people will or will not behave positively. We have to concern ourselves with conditions and influences that lead to positive, in contrast to other types of, behavior. When will people respond to others’ need, or take action to benefit others, in contrast to engaging in behavior for the sake of self-related outcomes?

Keywords

Prosocial Behavior Achievement Goal Goal Orientation Personal Goal Cognitive Network 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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