The Use of Antibodies against Synthetic Peptides for Studying the EBV Nuclear Antigen

  • J. Dillner
  • L. Eliasson
  • L. Sternås
  • B. Kallin
  • G. Klein
  • R. A. Lerner
Part of the Developments in Medical Virology book series (DIMV, volume 1)

Abstract

Five peptides corresponding to amino acid sequences predicted from the BamHI K fragment of the EBV genome have been synthesized (Table 1). The antisera raised against peptide no. 107, a copolymer of alanine and glycine deduced from the third internal repeat (IR3) sequence, gave brilliant nuclear staining in the anticomplement immunof1ourescence assay (AC IF) on eight EBV-carrying lines (Figure 1a),whereas five EBV-negative lines were not stained (Table 2). The nuclear staining was competed out by addition of the synthetic peptide (Figure 1b). 19 out of 21 EBNA-positive sera reacted with the synthetic peptide in an ELISA test, whereas EBV- negative sera did not react or gave very weak reactions (Figure 2). The 19 EBNA-positive sera that reacted with the peptide were all healthy donor sera whereas the 3 EBNA-positive sera that failed to react were Burkitt lymphoma (BL) patient sera.In a later series of experiments 34 EBNA-positive healthy donor sera were all found to react with the synthetic peptide, whereas out of 48 BL sera 19 did not have antibodies to this peptide (not shown).

Keywords

Lymphoma Glycine Electrophoresis Polyacrylamide Alanine 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dillner, J.,Sternås, L., Kallin, B., Alexander, H., Ehlin, B., Jörnvall, H. Klein, G and Lerner, R.A. Antibodies against a synthetic peptide identify the EBV-determined nuclear antigen(EBNA). Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA 81, 4652–4656 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Dillner, J., Kallin, B., Ehlin, B., Timar, L and Klein, G. Int. J. Cancer in press.Google Scholar
  3. Ernberg, I., Andersson-Anvret, M., Klein, G., Lundin,L. and Killander, D; Relationship between amount of EBV-determined nuclear antigen per cell and number of EBV DNA copies per cell. Nature; 266 (5599); 269–271, (1977).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Heller, M., Henderson, A. and Kieff, E. Repeat array in EBV DNA is related to cell DNA sequences interspersed on human chromosomes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 5916–5920 (1982).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hennessy K. and Kieff, E. One of two EBV nuclear antigens contains a glycine-alanine copolymer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA; 80: 5665–5669. (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Strnad, B., Schuster, T., Hopkins, R., Neubauer, R and Rabin, H. Identification of an EBNA by fluoroimmunoelectrophoresis and radioimmunoelectrophoresis. J. Virol. 38, 996–1004 (1981).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Dillner
    • 1
  • L. Eliasson
    • 1
  • L. Sternås
    • 1
  • B. Kallin
    • 1
  • G. Klein
    • 1
  • R. A. Lerner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Tumor BiologyKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden
  2. 2.Research Institute of Scripps ClinicLa JollaUSA

Personalised recommendations