On The Chemical Composition and Origin of Engine Deposits

  • Walter O. Siegl
  • Mikio Zinbo

Abstract

Knowledge of the chemical composition of engine deposits is essential to establishing the mechanisms of deposit formation and to understanding the influence of in-cylinder deposits on such problems as ORI and increased hydrocarbon emissions. Of particular concern is the identification of those deposit components which may be promoting deposit accumulation by functioning as binders.

Keywords

Combustion Argon Toluene Hydrocarbon Rubber 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter O. Siegl
    • 1
  • Mikio Zinbo
    • 1
  1. 1.Engineering and Research StaffFord Motor CompanyDearbornUSA

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