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B Cell Function in Acute Malaria

  • D. S. Kumararatne
  • P. Chiodini
  • C. Ellis
  • P. Richardson
  • T. G. Gentle
  • L. Walker
  • R. P. Stokes

Abstract

The development of protective immunity to malaria in humans is slow and incomplete1. Specific antibody responses to parasite antigens are an important component of protective immunity to parasites1. However, secondary humoral immunodeficiency which is known to occur in human and experimental malaria2 may prejudice the development of effective immunity to this parasite and may also contribute to the susceptibility of children living in endemic areas to infection by other microbial pathogens. The cellular mechanisms contributing to defective antibody production in malaria are incompletely understood2. The study of humoral immunosuppression in malaria in endemic areas is complicated by the coexistence of malnutrition and other parasitic diseases, both of which could contribute to the state of anergy. This study investigates possible cellular mechanisms of impaired antibody production in UK residents having acute attacks of malaria.

Keywords

Vivax Malaria Pokeweed Mitogen Polyclonal Activator Post Recovery Acute Malaria 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Kumararatne
    • 1
  • P. Chiodini
    • 2
  • C. Ellis
    • 2
  • P. Richardson
    • 1
  • T. G. Gentle
    • 2
  • L. Walker
    • 1
  • R. P. Stokes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyUniversity of Birmingham Medical SchoolBirminghamUK
  2. 2.Dept of Communicable and Tropical Diseases/Regional Immunology DeptEast Birmingham HospitalBirminghamUK

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