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Individual HSV Transcripts

Characterization of Specific Genes
  • Edward K. Wagner
Part of the The Viruses book series (VIRS)

Abstract

An increasingly complete picture of the phenomenology of animal vims gene expression during productive infection is at hand. In the case of herpesviruses [particularly herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)], this picture is dependent on the revolution in molecular biology resulting from restriction enzyme analysis of viral DNA and, more recently, from the use of recombinant DNA technology for the construction and analysis of fine probes of HSV-1 DNA transcription. These powerful techniques, along with techniques available from the parallel revolution in immunology and assays of biological activities, suggest that a detailed mechanistic description of the intricacies of HSV replication is technically feasible.

Keywords

Herpes Simplex Herpes Simplex Virus Type Thymidine Kinase Thymidine Kinase Gene Herpes Simplex Virus Genome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward K. Wagner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and BiochemistryUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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