Psychiatry pp 479-484 | Cite as

Psychiatric Casualties (Battle Shock) in Israeli Defense Forces in the War in Lebanon June-September 1982

  • Gregory Lucas Belenky
  • Shabtai Noy
  • Zahava Solomon
  • Franklin Del Jones

Abstract

The 1982 war in Lebanon differed qualitatively and quantitatively from the 1973 Arab-Israeli War. The 1982 conflict was fought at the time and in the manner chosen by the Israelis. It engaged only a portion of the IDF, and did not stress its logistic support. Intense military operations were conducted from 6 June 1982 until the initial cease fire on 11 June 1982, and during a further period from 21-26 June 1982, when the IDF cut the Beirut- Damascus Road. The majority of IDF casualties, including psychiatric casualties, were sustained during these periods of intense fighting. Overall, for the IDF in Lebanon during the period of June-December 1982, the ratio of psychiatric casualties to wounded has been cited as 23:100 (Shipler 1983). During the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, the ratio was higher, probably over 30:100 (Noy, personal communication). It appears that for an equivalent degree of combat stress, indicated by the relative number of wounded, psychiatric casualties in the IDF were lower during the 1982 war in Lebanon than during the 1973 war.

Keywords

Fatigue Depression Ambush 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory Lucas Belenky
    • 1
  • Shabtai Noy
    • 2
  • Zahava Solomon
    • 2
  • Franklin Del Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.Walter Reed Army Institute of ResearchWashington, DCUSA
  2. 2.Mental Health DepartmentIsraeli Defense ForceIsrael

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