Field Desorption and Field Ionization

  • H.-R. Schulten
  • Si-en Sun

Abstract

One important trend in the development of mass spectrometry (MS) during the last ten years has been the search for suitable ionization methods for polar, nonvolatile substances. The need for “soft ionization” has arisen from the difficulties in obtaining clear and complete (molecular ion plus structural details) mass spectra for many biochemically, pharmacologically, and toxicologically relevant molecules.

Keywords

Lithium Ozone Uranium Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Gallium 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.-R. Schulten
    • 1
  • Si-en Sun
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Trace AnalysisFachhochschule FreseniusWiesbadenFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Institute of Environmental ChemistryAcademia SinicaPekingChina

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