Appetitive Behavior May Serve as a Model For Studying The Neural Facilitation and Inhibition of Plasma Corticosterone Levels in Rats

  • Gary Coover
  • Carlton Lints
  • Deborah Stearn
  • G. Thomas Satterfield
Part of the Topics in the Neurosciences book series (TNSC, volume 2)

Abstract

Studies of the neural control of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal system have frequently suggested the existence of a neural system that inhibits the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons of the hypothalamus. The most explicit proposals have suggested that the neural inhibition of CRH neurons is mediated by α-adrenergic (probably α 1) receptors [4] and neurons in the area of the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus [7]. However, there is evidence that noradrenaline facilitates CRH neurons [6], and the general conception remains that CRH neurons are under predominantly facilitatory neural control while inhibition is predominantly or exclusively of a tonic, negative feedback nature. Most research on neural control of this system has used models focusing on basal levels and stress-induced activation.

Keywords

Noradrenaline Catecholamine Monoamine Corticosterone Yohimbine 

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Copyright information

© Matinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary Coover
    • 1
  • Carlton Lints
    • 1
  • Deborah Stearn
    • 1
  • G. Thomas Satterfield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorthern Illinois UniversityDekalbUSA

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