Reprocessing Techniques

  • Norman Deane
  • David L. Maude
  • James A. Bemis
Part of the Developments in Nephrology book series (DINE, volume 15)

Abstract

Reuse of hemodialyzers has expanded from a seldom-used technique to one that is now practiced by the majority of providers of end-stage renal disease care in the United States [1, 2]. In 1984 the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), recognizing the widespread adoption of reprocessing procedures, drafted a “Recommended Practice for Reuse of Hemodialyzers,” addressed to the physician responsible for reprocessing hemodialyzers either by manual or automated techniques [3]. The commercial availability, beginning in 1980–81, of automated reprocessing machines encouraged the spread of reuse, and automated devices are now used by 40% of the facilities practicing reuse in the United States [1].

Keywords

Cellulose Formaldehyde Chlorine Polypropylene Polyurethane 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Deane
  • David L. Maude
  • James A. Bemis

There are no affiliations available

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