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Metal-Catalyzed Reactions of Organic Compounds

  • Arthur E. Martell
Part of the Basic Symposium Series book series (IFTBSS)

Abstract

It is the purpose of this chapter to describe the various ways by which metal ions and metal complexes may catalyze reactions of organic compounds. Descriptions of reaction pathways and the mechanisms involved will be illustrated by examples of organic compounds present in foods or closely related compounds.

Keywords

Ascorbic Acid Molecular Oxygen Metal Chelate Oxidative Dehydrogenation Dehydroascorbic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© AVI Publishing Co. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur E. Martell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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