Advertisement

Functional Specification of Process-Control Software

  • F. Kaufmann
  • D. Schillinger
  • U. Schult

Abstract

Functional program mming languages are based on the mathematical concept of recursive functions. Such languages define the desired result of a computation as a static input-output mapping. Thus, programs expressed in a functional language can be considered as an executable specification. In contrast to procedural languages, the sequence of computation is not explicitly specified, which thereby facilitates the construction of programs.

At the BBC Research Center, the concepts of functional languages are applied to the development of a graphical programming environment which is used for the construction of process-control software. This programming environment is intended to be used by control engineers who may have little knowledge of computer science. Programs are constructed as data-flow graphs which correspond to the function charts traditionally used for the description of process-control mechanisms. The computer-supported graphic system is used for both programming and documentation. The graphic source is translated automatically into executable code.

Keywords

Functional Language Logical Information Logical Object State Chart Machine Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Backus, J., “Can Programming Be Liberated from the Von Neumann Style? A Functional Style and Its Algebra of Programs,”11 Commun. ACM, Vol. 21, No. 8, 1978, pp. 613–641.MathSciNetMATHGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bell, J.R., “Threaded Code,” Commun. ACM, Vol. 16, No. 6, 1973, pp. 370–372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    I EC Sub-Committee 65A, “Draft-Programmable Controllers,” Central Office of the I EC, 3, Rue de Varembe, Geneva, Switzerland.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Peterson, J.L., Petri Net Theory and the Modeling of Systems, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1981.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Scott, D., and Strachey, C., “Toward a Mathematical Semantics for Computer Languages,” in Proc. Symposium on Computers and Automata, J. Fox, ed., Polytechnic Institute of BrooklynGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Kaufmann
    • 1
  • D. Schillinger
    • 1
  • U. Schult
    • 1
  1. 1.Brown BoveriBadenSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations