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Odor Images: Responses of Beaver to Castoreum Fractions

  • D. Muller-Schwarze
  • L. Morehouse
  • R. Corradi
  • Cheng-hua Zhao
  • R. M. Silverstein

Abstract

The ideal way to bioassay a mammalian pheromone is to experiment with freely moving animals in a natural setting, and intact social units. The year-round family territories of the North American beaver, Castor canadensis, provide such an opportunity. Being largely nocturnal, beaver have depended on their chemical senses for social communication, food selection, and possibly other behaviors such as orientation in space, and predator detection and avoidance.

Keywords

Scent Mark Dimethyl Disulfide Anal Gland Odor Sample Castor Fiber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Muller-Schwarze
    • 1
  • L. Morehouse
    • 1
  • R. Corradi
    • 1
  • Cheng-hua Zhao
    • 1
  • R. M. Silverstein
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Environmental Science and ForestryState University of New YorkSyracuseUSA

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