The Treatment of Skin Graft Donor Sites

  • Keith Poskitt
  • Edward Lloyd-Davies
  • Alan James
  • Charles McCollum

Abstract

Skin grafting is commonly used in the treatment of burns, venous and ischaemic ulceration and post-operative wound defects. Most skin grafting can adequately be performed with the use of free skin grafts which can be broadly categorised into whole and split skin grafts. The use of pinch skin grafts (Fig 1) which are in effect whole skin grafts centrally and split skin grafts peripherally are more1,2 frequently being used for the treatment of venous ulceration . It is well described that the donor sites from which skin grafts are obtained are the source of more discomfort than the recipient site. This discomfort is caused by exposure of the dermal nerve endings and is diminished more rapidly it epithelialisation occurs readily. The presence of infection delays healing and can in addition cause increased discomfort. Donor site discomfort may also vary depending on the site from which the skin graft is obtained. In pinch skin grafting the donor sites more commonly used are the anterolateral and anteromedial aspect of the thigh.

Keywords

Oncol Dehydration Paraffin Polyurethane Dermatol 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Poskitt
    • 1
  • Edward Lloyd-Davies
    • 1
  • Alan James
    • 1
  • Charles McCollum
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryCharing Cross and Westminster Medical SchoolLondonUK

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