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Natural Air-Conditioning Systems

  • Mehdi N. Bahadori

Abstract

Recent research in summer air conditioning utilizing natural sources of coolness* are discussed. These systems are classified according to the sources of coolness, the modes of heat transfer and airflow, and the types of material employed for the storage of coolness.

The sources of coolness are the ambient water vapor, ambient air, and the upper atmosphere or the sky. The modes of heat transfer are evaporation, convection, and thermal radiation. The modes of airflow are natural, by wind and buoyancy effects, and forced, by fans.

The systems considered are classified according to the climate - that is, systems employed mostly in hot/arid and in hot/humid climates. In each region, review of the research is made first of the systems which do not use any auxiliary energy to augment heat transfer or fluid flow, i.e., completely passive systems, followed by a discussion of the research activities which use fans or pumps to provide air conditioning, i.e., low-energy systems. The energy-saving potentials of these systems are also discussed.

It is concluded that through natural air-conditioning systems, thermal comfort can be maintained for buildings’ occupants with substantial savings in the total energy consumption, and a significant reduction in the peak electric power requirements. The percentages of savings are higher in hot/arid regions than they are in moderate and hot/humid climates.

Keywords

Thermal Comfort Evaporative Cool Natural Ventilation Passive Cool Seasonal Storage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mehdi N. Bahadori

There are no affiliations available

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