Advertisement

Testing of the Superconducting Solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector

  • R. W. Fast
  • C. N. Holmes
  • R. D. Kephart
  • J. B. Stoffel
  • M. E. Stone
  • R. H. Wands
  • T. N. Zimmerman
  • K. Kondo
  • S. Mori
  • R. Yoshizaki
  • K. Asano
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 31)

Abstract

The 3 m Φ × 5 m long × 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the Fermi- lab Collider Detector has been installed at Fermilab and was tested in early 1985 with a dedicated refrigeration system. The refrigerator and 5.6−Mg magnet cold mass were cooled to 5 K in 210 hours. After testing at low currents, the magnet was charged to the design current of 5 kA in 5−MJ steps. During a 390 A/min charge a spontaneous quench occurred at 4.5 kA due to insufficient liquid helium flow. Three other quenches occurred during “slow” discharges which were nevertheless fast enough to cause high eddy current heating in the outer support cylinder. Quench behavior is well understood and the magnet is now quite reliable.

Keywords

Helium Flow Rate Superconducting Solenoid Quench Behavior Magnetic Field Mapping Cryogenic Engineer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. Wands et al., IEEE Trans, in Magnetics MAG-19;1368 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. Grimson et al., in: “Proc. 12th Intl. Conf. on High-Energy Accelerators,” Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois (1983), p. 639.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. Minemura et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods 219:472 (1984) and Nucl. Instrum. Methods to be published (1985).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. W. Fast et al., IEEE Trans, in Magnetics MAG-21:963 (1985)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    R. W. Fast et al., in: “Proc. 10th Intl. Cryogenic Engineeing Conference,” Butterworth, Guildford, UK (1984), p. 78.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    R. H. Wands and R. W. Fast, in: “Advances in Cryogenic Engineering,” Vol. 29, Plenum, New York (1984), p. 377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    R. W. Fast et al., in: “Proc. 9th Intl. Conf. on Magnet Technology,” Zurich (to be published).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    M. G. Zabetakis, “Safety with Cryogenic Fluids,” Plenum, New York (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Fermilab Safety Manual,” L. Coulson, ed., Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois (1981), chapter 15. 1.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    S. Mori et al., in: “Advances in Cryogenic Engineering,” Vol. 27, Plenum, New York (1982), p. 151.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    R. W. Fast and A. D. Mclnturff, “CDF Design Note 69,” Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, (1984) unpublished.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. W. Fast
  • C. N. Holmes
    • 1
  • R. D. Kephart
    • 1
  • J. B. Stoffel
    • 1
  • M. E. Stone
    • 1
  • R. H. Wands
    • 1
  • T. N. Zimmerman
    • 1
  • K. Kondo
    • 1
  • S. Mori
    • 2
  • R. Yoshizaki
    • 2
  • K. Asano
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Fermi National Accelerator LaboratoryBataviaUSA
  2. 2.University of Tsukuba SakuraIbarakiJapan
  3. 3.Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ltd.Hitachi, IbarakiJapan

Personalised recommendations