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Dependence and Compulsion

Experimental Models of Change
  • Howard Rankin
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (ABBI, volume 13)

Abstract

Prochaska and DiClemente (1982) suggest that behavioral techniques are most influential and valuable to the action and maintenance stages of their proposed model of change. The work reported on here suggests that they do indeed have great value at these stages, but also suggests that benefits can be derived at all levels and phases of realizing, coming to terms with, and really doing something about, the perceived problem. It is likely that, like the research reported here, behavioral treatments have effects on attitudes, expectations, and cognitions, and have utility not only in the action and maintenance phase, but in the early contemplative stages of the process.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Alcohol Dependence Blood Alcohol Concentration Control Session Response Prevention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Howard Rankin
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Andrew’s HospitalNorthhamptonEngland

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