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Behavioral Teratology of Alcohol

  • Linda S. Meyer
  • Edward P. Riley

Abstract

It has been over a decade since Jones and Smith (1973) brought to the attention of the medical community the effects of chronic maternal alcohol consumption on the developing fetus. They described a pattern of malformations in some children of chronic alcoholic women, which included distinct craniofacial anomalies, pre- and postnatal growth retardation, and some central nervous system dysfunction. They termed this cluster of anomalies the “fetal alcohol syndrome” (FAS). The incidence of FAS is now placed at about 1 or 2 cases per 1,000 live births. Additionally, another 3–5 infants per 1,000 live births are affected with some physical anomaly related to prenatal alcohol exposure, although they are not classified as having FAS. In the United States, between 6,000 and 11,000 infants are born each year with either a major or a minor anomaly related to prenatal alcohol exposure (Abel, 1984).

Keywords

Alcohol Exposure Liquid Diet Maternal Behavior Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Spontaneous Alternation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda S. Meyer
    • 1
  • Edward P. Riley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at AlbanyAlbanyUSA

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