Effect of Reagent Source, Processing Techniques, and Sample Storage on Determination of Circulating Human Immune Cells

  • William R. Oleszko
  • Alan A. Waldman
Part of the University of South Florida International Biomedical Symposia Series book series (USFIBSS)

Abstract

It is generally agreed that an accurate evaluation of an individual’s immune status should include information concerning the number and nature of the circulating immune lymphocytes. In order for the testing laboratory to correctly supply this data to treating physicians for use in reliable diagnosis of alterations of the immune system, and thus changes in their patient’s immune status, it is necessary that testing methods be standardized and comparable from one test site to another.

Keywords

Fractionation Fluorescein Alan 

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References

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    B. J. Weiblen, K. Debell, A. Giorgio, and C. R. Valeri, Monoclonal antibody testing of lymphocytes after overnight storage, Office of Naval Research Technical Report No. 83–12 (1983).Google Scholar
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    A. Boyum, Separation of leucocytes from blood and bone marrow, Scand. J. Clin. Invest. 21: Sup. 97 (1968).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • William R. Oleszko
    • 1
  • Alan A. Waldman
    • 1
  1. 1.Greater New York Blood ProgramNew York Blood CenterNew YorkUSA

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