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A Review of the Behavioral Effects of AF64A, A Cholinergic Neurotoxin

  • Thomas J. Walsh
  • Israel Hanin
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 29)

Abstract

Acetylcholine (ACh) was the first substance shown to mediate synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Since those early studies the biochemical events involved in the metabolism of ACh and its1 interaction with muscarinic and nicotinic receptors have been studied in great detail. Despite these efforts to unravel the molecular biology of ACh the functional properties of cholinergic systems and their involvement in neurological and psychiatric disorders remain undetermined. During the past five years however, there have been several important advances in our understanding of cholinergic biology. A general principle that has emerged from these efforts is the interdependent nature of discoveries in clinical and basic neuroscience. For example, delineating the structural, neurochemical and behavioral pathology of senile dementia of the Alzheimer’s type (SDAT) contributed to a better understanding of cholinergic involvement in disease states and also provided fundamental information about the anatomical and functional organization of cholinergic neurons.

Keywords

Passive Avoidance Kainic Acid ChAT Activity Its1 Interaction Passive Avoidance Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Walsh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Israel Hanin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Behavioral and Neurological ToxicologyNational Institute of Environmental Health SciencesResearch Triangle ParkUSA
  2. 2.Loyola University Stritch School of MedicineChicagoUSA

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