The Effect of Segment Orientation and Cell Growth on the Acropetal Flux Of Calcium

  • R. K. dela Fuente
  • C. C. de Guzman
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 104)

Abstract

Currently, the basipetal and lateral« polarity of auxin transport and the ensuing cellular growth that occurs is the only system that can explain the relatively rapid and effective means by which plants are able to respond to such stimuli as unilateral light or gravity. Very little information is known about how the polarity of IAA transport is accomplished. Dela Fuente and Leopold (1973) and dela Fuente (1984) showed that the basipetal transport of IAA is diminished in plant tissues deprived of Ca2+; a short incubation of such tissues in Ca2+ solution restored normal auxin transport.

Keywords

Mannitol 

References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. K. dela Fuente
    • 1
  • C. C. de Guzman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesKent State UniversityKentUSA

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