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Classification and Maps of Soils and their Interpretation for Planners

  • C. P. Burnham
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 10)

Abstract

Land has many properties relevant to its use: some derive from the natural environment, some from human activities. Even among the natural factors relevant to agriculture and forestry, climate and topography are of comparable importance to soil. Nevertheless if land potential is being appraised in an integrated manner soil is likely to be one of the most difficult factors to assess for, like geology, most of the evidence about soil is concealed and generalisations must inevitably be made from a relatively small sample. Indeed, even if the whole soil body could be investigated it would be greatly altered in the process! Soils are very complex bodies, and realistic models of their nature and distribution will, ipso facto, be complex. A clear understanding of the problems involved is therefore essential if expenditure on soil investigations including mapping is to be used cost-effectively. For these reasons three facets of the problem will be examined:
  1. (i)

    soil classification

     
  2. (ii)

    soil variability, and

     
  3. (iii)

    soil mapping and the use of soil maps.

     

Keywords

Soil Survey Mapping Unit Soil Classification Soil Series Planning Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. P. Burnham
    • 1
  1. 1.Wye CollegeUniversity of LondonKentEngland

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