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Endoscopic Procedures

  • Robert S. Neuwirth

Abstract

Gynecologic endoscopy had its origins in the early attempts to perform hysteroscopy by Pantaleone in 1867. Laparoscopy first appeared in the early twentieth century, and culdoscopy was developed by Decker around 1940. Historically, the utilization of hysteroscopy, laparoscopy, and culdoscopy relate to the comparative success of the equipment and techniques to overcome problems in the lighting, imaging, and distention of the cavities to be examined. Before the incandescent bulb, none of these procedures was very useful. With Edison’s contribution, laparoscopy was feasible, although lack of a satisfactory pneumoperitoneum hampered this procedure until Palmer’s work immediately after World War II. Culdoscopy, which used the knee-chest position, was an adequate substitute, as it could be performed with an incandescent bulb and did not require special pneumoperitoneum apparatus. Nevertheless, it was highly skill dependent and never gained widespread use.

Keywords

Incandescent Bulb Diagnostic Hysteroscopy Submucous Fibroid Hysteroscopic Sterilization Uterine Distention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert S. Neuwirth
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologySt. Luke’s/Roosevelt HospitalNew YorkUSA

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