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Mnemonic Interaction between and within Cerebral Hemispheres in Macaques

  • Robert W. Doty
  • Jeffrey D. Lewine
  • James L. Ringo

Abstract

Since its inception (Myers and Sperry, 1953) work on interhemispheric mnemonic transfer in animals has referred to the acquisition of a discrimination learned over many trials, first by one hemisphere and then by the other (see, e.g., Gazzaniga, 1970; Doty and Negrão, 1973; Hamilton, 1977; Butler, 1979). The experiments to be described herein utilize a significantly different procedure, in which macaques with transected optic chiasm are queried as to whether they can recognize with one eye and hemisphere visual images previously seen on but one occasion by the other eye and hemisphere. Using several thousand highly varied images, the capabilities of such interhemispheric comparison can be continually and repeatedly assessed, as can the level of such performance by each hemisphere individually. Thus, essentially for the first time, it will be possible to assay inter- and intrahemispheric processing in relation to memory for events, rather than, as heretofore, simply for rules.

Keywords

Corpus Callosum Left Hemisphere Optic Tract Optic Chiasm Anterior Commissure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert W. Doty
    • 1
  • Jeffrey D. Lewine
    • 1
  • James L. Ringo
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Brain ResearchUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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