Nicotine: Abuse Liability, Dependence Potential and Pharmacologic Treatment of Dependence

  • Jack E. Henningfield
  • Steven R. Goldberg
  • Donald R. Jasinski
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 31)

Abstract

Clinical observations, historical anecdotes, and testimony, suggest that at least some users of tobacco are unable to permanently abstain even when ill health is evident (e.g., Connolly, Winn, Hecht, Henningfield, Hoffman, and Walker, 1986). However, whereas such observations suggest that tobacco self-administration (S-A) can become an addictive behavior, such observations are not scientifically definitive statements that provide the basis for evaluating the abuse liability and dependence potential of tobacco products. Specifically, such observations do not provide a basis for differentiating tobacco S-A from other commonly accepted “addictive behaviors” such as television watching, exercise, or excessive eating; furthermore, such observations do not provide scientifically valid evidence that an addictive drug is critical to the maintenance of the addictive behavior. The distinction between nonspecific addictive behaviors and those involving certain drugs is not just semantic; the implications are critical to issues of public health, legislative jurisdiction, and treatment of the behavior. The purpose of the present report is to summarize evidence that tobacco is a dependence-producing substance according to the same scientific criteria by which other substances are evaluated.

Keywords

Placebo Catheter Nicotine Morphine Cocaine 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack E. Henningfield
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Steven R. Goldberg
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Donald R. Jasinski
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.NIDA Addiction Research CenterBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.National Institute on Drug Abuse Addiction Research CenterUSA
  3. 3.School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityUSA
  4. 4.School of MedicineUniversity of MarylandUSA

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