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Methodological Issues in Cognitive Retraining Research

  • Gregory W. Harter

Abstract

Over the past few decades, numerous theories and procedures have been developed to remediate the cognitive impairment caused by brain injury (Diller & Gordon, 1981). These procedures have focused largely on the remediation of language and memory disorder. Some have been empirically evaluated using group outcome studies, but most are presented in the context of a narrative case report or through the use of a single-subject experimental design.

Keywords

Spontaneous Recovery Brain Damage Severe Head Injury Cognitive Remediation Multiple Baseline Design 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

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  • Gregory W. Harter

There are no affiliations available

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