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Acoustic Microscopy: Materials Art and Materials Science

  • R. S. Gilmore
  • R. E. Joynson
  • C. R. Trzaskos
  • J. D. Young
Conference paper
Part of the Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation book series (RPQN, volume 6 A)

Abstract

Significant progress has been made in acoustic microscopy and other forms of acoustic imaging over the last two decades. Originally introduced by Quate [1], this technology has been established by Weglin [2], Kino [3], Wickramasinghe [4], Bertoni [5], and Quate [6] as a powerful tool for materials characterization and development. The work described here [7] goes beyond that cited: it utilizes time-resolved acoustic signals of much greater bandwidth, and does not rely on V(z) behavior to form images. Instead only the digitized amplitudes of the spatially and temporally resolved acoustic signals are processed and displayed to form the images. Much of the progress reported here is also due to advances in computer display technology. Originally presented as posters, the included figures demonstrate various hardcopy and high-resolution raster displays incorporated in the described acoustic microscope. Keeping in mind the purpose for which each image was intended, it is instructive to compare the image quality that the different displays can produce. Six figures, containing twenty-nine separate images, make up the presentation. In their original display format, each figure was a 30 × 40 in. poster in which the individual images were displayed at the identical magnifications that were initially presented to the acoustic microscopist.

Keywords

Surface Wave Acoustic Image Acoustic Beam Acoustic Microscopy Titanium Sponge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [1]
    R.A. Lemons and C.F. Quate, “Acoustic Microscopy by Mechanical Scanning,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 24, 165 (1973).Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    R.D. Weglin and R.G. Wilson, “Characteristic Materials Signatures by Acoustic Microscopy,” Electron. Lett. 14, 352 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    G.S. Kino, “Fundamentals of Scanning Systems,” in Scanned Image Microscopy, ed. E.A. Ash, Academic Press, London (1980).Google Scholar
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    H.K. Wickramasinghe, “Contrast and Imaging Performance in the Scanning Acoustic Microscope,” J. Appl. Phys. 50, 664 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    H.L. Bertoni and T. Tamir, “Unified Theory of Rayleigh-Angle Phenomena for Acoustic Beams at Liquid-Solid Interfaces,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 2 (1973).Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    C.F. Quate, “Microwaves, Acoustics and Scanning Microscopy,” in Scanned Image Microscopy, ed. E.A. Ash, Academic Press, London (1980).Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    R.S. Gilmore, K.C. Tam, J.D. Young, and D.R. Howard, “Acoustic Microscopy From 10 to 100 MHz for Industrial Applications,” Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London, A320, 215 - 235 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Gilmore
    • 1
  • R. E. Joynson
    • 1
  • C. R. Trzaskos
    • 1
  • J. D. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Corporate Research and DevelopmentGeneral Electric CompanySchenectadyUSA

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