Mango Pickles and Goat Grass: Family Fieldwork in an Indian Village

  • Doranne Jacobson

Abstract

In the heart of India there is a small settlement of agriculturalists, artisans, and entrepreneurs living in mud-plastered houses nestled at the foot of a forest-covered hill. None of the villagers have travelled outside of India and most have but a dim idea of the location of America, which they call “Amirka, ” or “Land of the Rich. ” In fact, some of the least sophisticated of the villagers believe America lies somewhere near the snowcapped Himalayas, as they have heard America is a country of ice and snow, very unlike the tropical region they inhabit. But however uninformed these villagers may be about New World geography, they know a surprising amount about American family life, as they have been able to observe at first hand an American family which has been associated with their village for several years.

Keywords

Clay Hepatitis Dust Foam Income 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Doranne Jacobson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, Barnard College and Southern Asian InstituteColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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