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Cocaine: Drug Epidemic of the ‘80’s

  • Arnold M. Washton

Abstract

Cocaine use in the United States has reached epidemic levels in recent years. Nationwide surveys estimate that over 22 million Americans have already tried cocaine at least once in their lifetime and that as many as two million or more may be severely dependent on the drug (1). The “800-COCAINE” National Hotline, established in 1983, has received over 1.5 million calls in its first three years of existence, with a continuing influx of more than 1,400 calls per day (2,3,4).

Keywords

Cocaine Abuser Cocaine User Cocaine Dependence Alcoholic Anonymous Cocaine Hydrochloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnold M. Washton
    • 1
  1. 1.800-COCAINE National HotlineFair Oaks HospitalSummitUSA

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