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Pleistocene Australia

Peopling a Continent
  • Harry Lourandos
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Following a generation of investigation, the archaeological and environmental outlines of the Pleistocene prehistory of Australia have now been sketched. Although the details may remain preliminary, enough exist to enable a reevaluation of earlier models concerning the occupation of the fifth continent.

Keywords

Late Pleistocene Archaeological Site Aboriginal Study Stone Tool Australian Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry Lourandos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and SociologyUniversity of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia

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