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Juvenile Delinquency

  • Peter W. Zinkus
  • Paul King

Abstract

Juvenile crime is a problem of epidemic proportions and one that touches every person. The issue has justifiably provoked a national anxiety, both in terms of its staggering economic impact and in the loss of human potential. The necessity for rehabilitation of juvenile offenders, as well as research into the prevention of juvenile crime, has become a priority issue for local and federal governments. Congressional hearings in 1977 reflected a national direction for active intervention into this problem. A literal army of youthful offenders represents a threat to social conscience, economic stability, and personal safety.

Keywords

Delinquent Behavior Reading Disability Learn Disability Juvenile Delinquency Juvenile Court 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter W. Zinkus
    • 1
  • Paul King
    • 2
  1. 1.Child Psychology DivisionLe Bonheur Children’s Medical CenterMemphisUSA
  2. 2.Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Adolescent Services, Charter Lakeside HospitalUniversity of Tennessee Center for the Health SciencesMemphisUSA

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