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Historical Perspectives

  • Benjamin L. CrueJr.
Part of the Current Management of Pain book series (CUMP, volume 1)

Abstract

Pain probably remains the most common symptom motivating humans to seek medical treatment. The complaint of pain and suffering extends back in time to the dawn of recorded history, from the Edwin Smith papyrus[1] to the story of Job in the Old Testament[2,3] Over the years, many remedies have been clinically successful to some degree, especially for acute pain due to injury or inflammation. This has been well documented by many authors, such as Keele[4] and Todd[5,6]. Peripheral acting analgesics (aspirin from tree bark) and centrally acting narcotics (such as extract from the poppy) have been used for centuries.

Keywords

Chronic Pain Nerve Block Acute Pain Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin L. CrueJr.

There are no affiliations available

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