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Platinum Coordination Derivatives by the Intraperitoneal Route: Pharmacokinetics and Clinical Results

  • W. W. Ten Bokkel Huinink
  • W. V. D. Vijgh
  • R. Dubbelman
  • A. P. M. Heintz
  • H. Franklin
  • J. G. McVie
Part of the Developments in Oncology book series (DION, volume 54)

Abstract

Notwithstanding improvement of treatment results in ovarian cancer, even the patient who achieved a complete remission may face a relapse. The seven year follow-up figures of the study performed in the Netherlands (1), which compared cisplatin containing combination chemotherapy CHAP-5 (cyclophosphamide, hexamethylmelamine, adriamy-cin and cisplatin) with HexaCAF (hexamethylmelamine, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and 5-flourouracil) show a steadily decrease of the number of disease free patients upto 60–70% of those formerly in complete remission. Therefore even for patients in complete remission as a result of cisplatin based combination chemotherapy new treatment strategies seem warranted. For the other, not reaching a complete remission this counts the more. Late intensification by an increased dose of cisplatin for instance could offer such a new treatment avenue, based on the theory of Goldie and Coldman (2). Such an increased dose might overcome acquired cisplatin resistance of remaining tumorcells.

Keywords

Ovarian Cancer Complete Remission Minimal Residual Disease Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Disease Free Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing, Boston 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. W. Ten Bokkel Huinink
  • W. V. D. Vijgh
  • R. Dubbelman
  • A. P. M. Heintz
  • H. Franklin
  • J. G. McVie

There are no affiliations available

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