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Programmable Electronic Reconfiguration Switches

  • Stuart K. Tewksbury
Part of the The Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 70)

Abstract

Although physical reconfiguration/restructuring switches dominate most commercial reconfigured VLSI circuits (e.g. memory repair), electronic switches are prominently used in experimental logic circuits designed for yield enhancement. Figure 10.1 shows the general model of an electronic switch for reconfiguration of interconnections. In addition to the specific switching of an input line INPUT to an output line OUTPUT, the open/closed state of the switch must be stored at the switch site. Furthermore, since the programmable electronic switches considered here are often volatile, that open/closed state information may have to be externally loaded into the storage node (typically a flip-flop or a latch). In Figure 10.1, this external loading is provided by two global lines, one providing the switch state and the other a control signal loading that state into the storage node.

Keywords

Switch Resistance Data Path Switch State Area Overhead Electronic Switch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart K. Tewksbury
    • 1
  1. 1.AT&T Bell LaboratoriesUSA

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