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A White House Perspective on Risk Communication

  • Alvin L. Young
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Issues in Risk Analysis book series (CIRA, volume 4)

Abstract

The past two decades have ushered in a shift of almost revolutionary proportions in the study of health and disease. The preoccupation with infectious disease has been replaced with a heavy commitment to the study of chronic, life-threatening illnesses. Increasingly, more investigators have recognized that behaviors that place an individual at risk for developing physical illness seldom occur in isolation from other pathogenic activities. Although the public acknowledges that life-style and disease are related (e.g., smoking may be detrimental to your health), the fear of malign influences in our environment is so widespread today that the general public believes that it is those factors they cannot control that will bring about their early demise. Thus, a major concern is the presence of “unwanted” chemicals in our environment.

Keywords

Risk Assessment Risk Communication Technology Policy Hazard Identification Staff Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alvin L. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of Agricultural BiotechnologyU.S.D.A.USA

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