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Protection of Polar Platforms from Penetrating Radiation

  • G. L. Wrenn
  • A. J. Sims
  • C. S. Dyer
  • P. R. Truscott
Chapter
Part of the Nato ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 154)

Abstract

The next era in space utilisation will encompass a new generation of large spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) at high inclination. These Polar Platforms will provide facilities for numerous experiment and application efforts requiring global coverage or access to the important high latitude regions, at low or moderate altitudes. Such platforms might require manual assembly in orbit, could be manned for extended periods, or they could be serviced at intervals during their lifetime (man-tended). During the late 1960s and 70s a large number of relatively small LEO satellites were successfully flown in near-polar orbits; it is now pertinent to consider the new factors which could detrimentally influence the interaction of future spacecraft with their environment so that proper account of these effects may be taken in any mission design phase.

Keywords

Solar Flare Linear Energy Transfer South Atlantic Anomaly Trap Proton Plastic Track Detector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Controller HMSO, London 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. L. Wrenn
    • 1
  • A. J. Sims
    • 1
  • C. S. Dyer
    • 1
  • P. R. Truscott
    • 1
  1. 1.Spacecraft Protection and Environment Space DepartmentRoyal Aircraft EstablishmentFarnborough, HantsUK

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