Use of Demographic Information in Neuropsychological Assessment

  • Laetitia L. Thompson
  • Robert K. Heaton
Part of the Foundations of Neuropsychology book series (FNPS, volume 2)

Abstract

For many years now, articles have appeared in the neuropsychological literature exploring the relationship between demographic variables and adult neuropsychological test performance. Unquestionably, the most commonly studied variable has been age, with studies first appearing in the 1950s. Educational achievement level has also been found to correlate with test performance and has received considerable attention, mostly in the last ten years. Gender has been considered in neuropsychology studies more recently, and socioeconomic status, race, and handedness have been mentioned in a few articles.

Keywords

Covariance Hunt Seco Poss Lawson 

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laetitia L. Thompson
  • Robert K. Heaton

There are no affiliations available

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