Advertisement

Bioelectrical Impedance Indices in Protein-Energy Malnourished Children as an Indicator of Total Body Water Status

  • Carolina Vettorazzi
  • Susana Molina
  • Carlos Grazioso
  • Manolo Mazariegos
  • Mei-Ling Siu
  • Noel W. Solomons
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 55)

Abstract

In Guatemala, as in many developing countries, various forms of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) — kwashiorkor (edematous), marasmus (starvation), and marasmic-kwashiorkor (mixed) — still prevail. The loss of fat mass and of lean body mass attendant to severe malnutrition can cause a change in the distribution of water and solids within the body. Both the percentage of total body water and of extracellular water in malnourished children is above normal even when there is not a clinical edema (Viteri, 1981).

Keywords

Body Composition Total Body Water Bioelectrical Impedance Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis Severe Malnutrition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barillas-Mury, C., Vettorazzi, C., Molina, S., and Pineda, O., 1966, Experience with bioelectrical impedance analysis in young children: Source of variability, in: In Vivo Body Composition Studies, K. J. Ellis, S. Yasumura, and W. D. Morgan, eds., Bocardo press Limited, Oxford, pp 87.Google Scholar
  2. Cordain, L., Whicher, R., and Johnson, J. E., 1988, Body composition determination in children using bioelectrical impedance. Growth Development and Aging, 52: 37.Google Scholar
  3. Hoffer, E.C., Reador, C., ind Simpson, D.C., 1969, Correlation of wholebody impedance with total body water volume. J. Appl. Physiol., 27:531.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Kuchner, R.K., and Schoeller, D.A., 1986, Estimation of total body water by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Am. J. Clin. Nutr., 44:417.Google Scholar
  5. McLaren, D.S., and Walter, R., 1983, Classification of nutritional status in early childhood, Lancet 2:146.Google Scholar
  6. Molina, S., Arango, T., Pineda, O., and Solomons, N.W., 1987, Response of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) indices to rehydration therapy in severe infantile diarrhea. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 45: abstract, pp 837Google Scholar
  7. Morgan, P., Golden, B., Bocage, C., and Golden, N., 1989, Prediction of total body water and body composition from bioelectrical impedance measures in Jamaican infants during recovery from severe malnutrition. FASEG Jr., 3: A4804.Google Scholar
  8. Segal, K.R., Gutin, B., Presta, E., Wang, J., and Van Itallie, T.B., 1985, Estimation of human body composition by electrical impedance methods: a comparative study. J. Appl. Physiol., 58(5):1565.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Viteri, F.E., 1981, Primary protein-energy malnutrition: Clinical biochemical and metabolic changes, in: Textbook of Pediatric Nutrition, R. M. Suskind, ed., Raven Press, New York, pp 189.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolina Vettorazzi
    • 1
  • Susana Molina
    • 1
  • Carlos Grazioso
    • 1
  • Manolo Mazariegos
    • 1
  • Mei-Ling Siu
    • 1
  • Noel W. Solomons
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Studies of Sensory Impairment, Aging and Metabolism (CeSSIAM)Research Branch of the National Committee for the Blind and Deaf of GuatemalaGuatemalaGuatemala

Personalised recommendations