Prompt Gamma Measurements of Nitrogen and Chlorine in Normal Volunteers

  • S J S Ryde
  • W D Morgan
  • D W Thomas
  • J L Birks
  • C J Evans
  • P A Ali
  • H Jenkins
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 55)

Abstract

The Swansea in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) instrument, which is based on a 4 GBq Cf-252 neutron source, has been developed primarily for the prompt-gamma measurement of total body (TB) Ca, N, Cl, H and C, and partial body Cd, using semiconductor (HPGe) and scintillation (HaI) gamma ray detectors (Ryde et al., 1987).

Keywords

Hydration Bromide Chlorine Tritium Glyco 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S J S Ryde
    • 1
  • W D Morgan
    • 1
  • D W Thomas
    • 2
  • J L Birks
    • 1
  • C J Evans
    • 2
  • P A Ali
    • 1
  • H Jenkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Swansea In Vivo Analysis Research Group, Department of Medical Physics and Clinical EngineeringSingleton HospitalSwanseaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUniversity College of SwanseaSwanseaUK

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