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The Measurement of Bone Lead Content in Patients With End Stage Renal Failure

  • Sarah J. Jones
  • A. J. Williams
  • Hana Kudlac
  • I. R. Hainsworth
  • W. D. Morgan
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 55)

Abstract

Acute renal failure due to lead exposure was a common problem in 19th century industrial society, but is now rarely seen. The role of lead in the development or chronic renal failure is, however, less certain. Although epidemiological studies of populations exposed to lead have suggested an increased incidence of renal insufficiency in these groups, only about 1% of all cases of end-stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy are reported to be caused by toxic nephropathy. This may merely be due to underdiagnosis. For example, in a recent study from Belgium (Van de Vyver et al., 1988), 5% of the dialysis population were found to have bone lead concentrations that approximated levels found in active lead workers.

Keywords

Renal Replacement Therapy Lead Exposure Bone Biopsy Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Lead Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarah J. Jones
    • 1
  • A. J. Williams
    • 2
  • Hana Kudlac
    • 2
  • I. R. Hainsworth
    • 3
  • W. D. Morgan
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medical PhysicsSwansea In Vivo Analysis Research GroupSwanseaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Renal MedicineMorriston HospitalSwanseaUSA
  3. 3.Chemical PathologySingleton HospitalSwanseaUSA

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