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Multimedia Application Development Techniques

  • John Bates
  • Jean Bacon
Part of the The Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 359)

Abstract

This chapter describes techniques which have been developed to assist with the authoring and run-time management of applications which involve the interactive presentation of multimedia data items. By interactive presentation we mean the the ability to support the following activities:
  • Access, processing, analysis, synchronization, display or storage of multiple media types.

  • Interaction with the media. Human interaction with the media should not just be limited to single users; a further requirement is the ability to support multi-user collaboration via views of media items. We must also take into account interaction from the environment, e.g. requests to adjust media resource usage.

Keywords

Multimedia Application Application Developer Class Hierarchy Presentation Object 2Common Object Request Broker Architecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Bates
    • 1
  • Jean Bacon
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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