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Integration of Information Retrieval and Hypertext Via Structure

  • Ross Wilkinson
  • Michael Fuller
Part of the Information Retrieval and Hypertext book series (EPUB)

Abstract

If we wish to access information from a large collection of unrelated abstracts, then a method that finds all potentially relevant information and presents it in ranked order is likely to be very helpful. If we have a well structured body of small pieces of information, then browsing through the information is likely to be very helpful. That is, there are situations in which information retrieval and in which hypertext are the ideal method of accessing information.

Keywords

Information Retrieval Document Collection Query Language Information Retrieval System Structure Document 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross Wilkinson
    • 1
  • Michael Fuller
    • 1
  1. 1.Royal Melbourne Institute of TechnologyAustralia

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