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Handover Performance: Propagation and Traffic Issues

  • Gamini Senarath
  • David Everitt
Part of the The Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 351)

Abstract

Efficient handoff is very important for cellular mobile communication systems because the number of handoffs increases with the smaller cell sizes needed for high capacity systems. Propagation, traffic, switching and processing are all important issues in assessing handoff performance, and most of the past performance studies have focussed on only one of these issues.

In this paper, we discuss various issues related to handoff performance and the interdependency of these issues by carrying out investigations on a combined platform. In particular, we consider handover strategies, signal strength prediction schemes, handover priority schemes and handoff priority level assignment schemes. It is shown that individually optimised solutions will not provide the optimum solution in the combined system, and the need for investigations in an integrated environment is emphasised.

Keywords

Receive Signal Strength Channel Assignment Handoff Call Handover Strategy Handoff Decision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gamini Senarath
    • 1
  • David Everitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia

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