Advertisement

Peritonectomy procedures

  • Paul H. Sugarbaker
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 82)

Abstract

Peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal malignancy has always been regarded as a lethal clinical condition. Recently, a new strategy for treatment of established colorectal tumor implants within the abdominal cavity has been reported. A rationale for these treatments, based on the natural history of large bowel cancer, has been presented [1–11]. An interpretation of the pathobiology that regulates the distribution of cancer deposits within the abdominal cavity has been proposed [12,13 unpublished observations]. A pharmacologic basis for intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration as adjuvant therapy in the early postoperative period has been established [14,15]. The prognostic features that would allow proper patient selection have been recorded [16,17 unpublished observations]. These studies show that the lesser the extent of peritoneal carcinomatosis and the lower its invasive and metastatic potential, the better the results of cytoreductive treatment.

Keywords

Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Left Gastric Artery Early Postoperative Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Posterior Rectus Sheath 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Sugarbaker PH. Cancer of the appendix and pseudomyxoma peritonei. In Fazio VW, ed. Current Therapy in Colon and Rectal Surgery. Philadelphia: BC Decker, 1989, pp 141–170.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Sugarbaker PH, Cunliffe W, Belliveau JF, deBruijn EA, Graves T, Mullins R, Schlag P, Gianola F. Rationale for perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy as a surgical adjuvant for gastrointertinal malignancy. Reg Cancer Treat 1988;1:66–79.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sugarbaker PH. Surgical treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Can J Surg 1989;32: 164–170.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sugarbaker PH. Management of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Progress in regional Cancer Therapy. Acta Med Austriaca 1989;3:57–60.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sugarbaker PH, Cunliffe WJ, Belliveau JF, deBruijn EA, Graves T, Mullins RE, Schlag P. Rationale for integrating early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) into the surgical treatment of gastrointestinal cancer. Semin Oncol 1989;16:87–97.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sugarbaker PH, Landy D, Pascal R. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal carcinomatosis from colonic or appendicial cystadenocarcinoma: Rationale and results of treatment. In Ragaz J, ed. Effects of Therapy on Biology and Kinetics of Surviving Tumor. New York: Alan R. Liss, 1991, pp 141–170.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sugarbaker PH. Cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy with peritoneal spread of cystadenocarcinoma. Eur J Surg 1991;561(Suppl):75–82.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Sugarbaker PH. The natural history of large bowel cancer, surgical implications. J Exp Clin Cancer Res 1989;8:41–43.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Vidal-Jove J, Sugarbaker PH. Curative approach to abdominal mesothelioma: Case report and review of the literature. Reg Cancer Treat 1991;3:269–274.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sugarbaker PH. Rule of least margins: Rationale for surgical treatment planning in gastrointestinal cancer. Reg Cancer Treat 1991;4:116–120.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Sugarbaker PH. Mechanisms of relapse for colorectal cancer: Implications for intraperitoneal chemotherapy. J Surg Oncol 1991;2:36–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Sugarbaker PH. Observations concerning cancer spread within the peritoneal cavity and concepts supporting an ordered pathophysiology. In Sugarbaker PH, ed. Peritoneal Carcinomatosis: Principles of management. Norwell, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996, pp. 79–100.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sugarbaker TA, Chang D, Koslowe P, Sugarbaker PH. Patterns of spread of recurrent intraabdominal sarcoma. In Sugarbaker PH, ed. Peritoneal Carcinomatosis: Principles of Management. Norwell, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996, pp. 65–77.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Speyer JL, Sugarbaker PH, Collins JM, Dedrick RL, Klecker RW Jr, Meyers CE. Portal levels and hepatic clearance of 5-fluorouracil after intraperitoneal administration in humans. Cancer Res 1981;41:1916–1922.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Sugarbaker PH, Landy D, Pascal R, Jaffe G. Histologic changes induced by intraperitoneal chemotherapy in patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from cystadenocarcinoma of the large bowel. Cancer 1990;65:1495–1501.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Sugarbaker PH, Bowei Z, Banez Sese G, Shmookler B. Peritoneal carcinomatosis from appendiceal cancer: Results in 69 patients treated by cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Dise Colon Rectum 1993;36:323–329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Sugarbaker TA, Jablonski KA. Prognostic features of 51 colorectal and 130 appendiceal cancer patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis treated by cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Ann Surg 1995;221:124–132.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Sugarbaker PH, Kern K, Lack E. Malignant pseudomyxoma of colonic origin. Natural history and presentation of a curative approach to treatment. Dis Colon Rectum 1987;30: 772–779.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Fernandez-Trigo V, Sugarbaker PH. Diagnosis and management of postoperative gastrointestinal fistula: A kinetic analysis. J Exp Clin Cancer Res, in press.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Esquivel J, Vidal-Jove J, Steves MA, Sugarbaker PH. Morbidity and mortality of cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Surgery 1993;113:631–636.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Moreno E, Sugarbaker PH. Gastrointestinla fistual following cytoreductive procedures for peritoneal carcinomatosis: Incidence and outcome. J Exp Clin Cancer Res 1993;12:153–158.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Vidal-Jove J, Pessagno AM, Esquivel J, Buck DR, Steves MA, Sugarbaker PH. Technical aspects and morbidity assessment of intraperitoneal chemotherapy administered by repeated paracentesis. Reg Cancer Treat 1992;4:294–297.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Sugarbaker PH, Averbach AM, Jacquet P, Stephens AD, Stuart OA. A simplified approach to hyperthermic intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIIC) using a self retaining retractor. In Sugarbaker PH, ed. Peritoneal Carcinomatosis: Principles of Management. Norwell, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996, pp 414–418.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Vidal-Jove J, Sugarbaker PH. Curative approach to abdominal mesothelioma: Case report and review of the literature. Reg Cancer Treat 1991;3:269–274.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Sugarbaker PH, Graves T, Sweatman TW. Early postoperative intraperitoneal adriamycin. Pharmacologic studies and a preliminary clinical report. Reg Cancer Treat 1991;4:127–131.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Hryniuk WM. Average relative dose intensity and the impact on design of clinical trials. Semin Oncol 1987;14:65–74.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    DeVita VT, Hubbard SM, Longo DL. The chemotherapy of lymphomas: Looking back, moving forward. The Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Award Lecture. Cancer Res 1987;47:5810–5824.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Torres IG, Litterest CL, Guarino AM. Transport of model compounds across the peritoneal membrane in the rat. Pharmacology 1987;17:330–340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Feldman GB, Knapp RI. Lymphatic drainage of the peritoneal cavity and its significance in ovarian cancer. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1974;119:991–994.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul H. Sugarbaker

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations