Magnetic Monopoles, Fiber Bundles, and Gauge Fields

  • Chen Ning Yang
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 352)

Abstract

The reports in this monograph have shown great enthusiasm and exuberance for the unification of various interactions through the concept of gauge fields. I would like to emphasize a point that has not yet been explicitly stated by any of the other authors: gauge fields are deeply related to some profoundly beautiful ideas of contemporary mathematics, ideas that are the driving forces of part of the mathematics of the last 40 years. Recalling the relationship between physics and mathematics in earlier periods, general relativity and Riemannian geometry, quantum mechanics and Hilbert space, it is all too obvious that physicists may again be zeroing in on a fundamental new secret of nature.

Keywords

Rubber Electromagnetism 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Ning Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Theoretical PhysicsState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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