The Pleistocene—Holocene Transition in the Eastern United States

  • Dan F. Morse
  • David G. Anderson
  • Albert C. Goodyear
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

We define the eastern United States for the purposes of this chapter as being bordered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet on the north, the ancestral Gulf of Mexico on the south, the Atlantic Ocean on the east, and the Western Plains on the west. These borders enclose most of the area between the latitudes 25–50°N and longitudes 65–90°W a region of ecological diversity and complexity even today.

Keywords

Dust Smoke Charcoal Gravel Holocene 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan F. Morse
    • 1
  • David G. Anderson
    • 2
  • Albert C. Goodyear
    • 3
  1. 1.Arkansas Archeological SurveyState UniversityUSA
  2. 2.National Park ServiceAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Archaeology and AnthropologyUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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